Health History - LifeSource

LifeSource

Click on the links below for more information on how they affect your eligibility to donate blood.

For additional questions, please contact our Medical Help Desk by calling 847.260.2647 or submitting an inquiry through our Contact Us page.

Dura Mater (Brain-Covering) Graft
Flu
Heart Disease
Heart Tests and Treatments
Hepatitis
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
Illness
Immunization/Vaccination
Malaria
Medications
Nursing
Permanent Makeup Application
Piercing (Ears, Body), Electrolysis
Pregnancy
Skin Disease, Rash, Acne, Poison Ivy
Tattoo
Weight


 

 

Acupuncture

Donors who have undergone acupuncture treatments are acceptable, as long as sterile and/or disposable needles were used.

Allergies

You can donate if you are currently experiencing acceptable symptoms. Acceptable symptoms are a runny nose and a non-productive cough. (Allergy shots are acceptable.)

Anemia

Unless you are on an iron supplement prescribed by your physician, you can donate. We check your iron levels as part of our medical interview to ensure they are high enough for you to donate.

Antibiotics

You are not eligible to donate blood if you are currently taking antibiotics for an infection.

Babesiosis

You are not eligible to donate blood if you have Babesiosis (Babesia infection.)

Blood Clot

If you have had a clot in a blood vessel within the last six months or if the blood clot has gone to your lungs in the last six months, you are not eligible to donate.

Blood Disease

The following list of blood diseases are an indefinite deferral:

  • Aplastic anemia
  • Coagulation factor deficiency
  • Hemophilia
  • Sickle cell disease
    • The trait is acceptable
  • Thalassemia major
  • Von Willebrands disease
    • If not undergoing treatment you are acceptable
  • HIV

Blood Exposure

If you have had a non-sterile needle stick or blood or body fluid exposure onto a break in the skin or mucous membrane (mouth, eyes, etc.) within the last 12 months, you cannot donate.

Blood Pressure

If you have high blood pressure and have been or are currently being treated (i.e. taking medication) you can donate as long as your blood pressure is within a safe range. We require it to be less than 180/100 and greater than 90/50.

Blood Transfusion

If you have received a blood transfusion (of either whole blood or blood products) in the last 12 months, you are not eligible to donate blood.

Cancer

Eligibility is dependent on the type of cancer and when treatment was completed:

  • Leukemia and Lymphoma: Permanent deferral.
  • Malignant Melanoma: Eligible two years after final treatment with no reoccurrence (previously permanent.)
  • Skin Cancer: You can donate if the skin cancer was diagnosed as non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell or squamous cell skin cancer) and the cancer has been removed or treatment has been completed greater than one week ago.
  • Solid Tumor Cancer: Eligible two years after final treatment with no reoccurrence (previously five years.)

Chagas Disease

You are not eligible to donate blood if you have Chagas disease.

Chronic Illnesses

Most chronic illnesses are acceptable as long as you feel well, the condition is under good control, you have an adequate hemoglobin level and your temperature is normal when you come to donate. You must meet all other eligibility requirements.

Cold

See ILLNESS.

Corneal Transplant

If you have had a corneal transplant, you are indefinitely deferred from donating.

Creutzfeld-Jakob

If you have Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, if you have been notified you have an increased risk of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease or if you have a blood relative with Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, you are indefinitely deferred from donating.

Dental Procedures and Oral Surgery

Acceptable after dental procedures as long as there is no infection present. Wait until finishing antibiotics for a dental infection. Wait for three days after having oral surgery. Gum transplants and bone grafts, done orally, require one year wait following procedure.

Diabetes

You can donate if your diabetes is controlled with oral medication or non-bovine insulin.

Dura Mater (Brain-Covering) Graft

If you have received a dura mater graft, you may be at risk for Creutzfeld-Jakob disease and are not eligible to donate.

Flu

See ILLNESS.

Heart Disease:

In general, acceptable as long as you have been medically evaluated and treated, have no current (within the last six months) heart-related symptoms (such as chest pain) and have no limitations or restrictions on your normal daily activities.

Heart Tests and Treatments:

  • Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG): Deferred for one year after surgery
  • Pacemaker: Acceptable with personal cardiologist’s approval to donate
  • Stent: Acceptable three months post-surgery
  • Valve Replacement: Acceptable 12 months post-surgery
  • Heart Attack: Acceptable 12 months after last episode if you have no restrictions on activities and have received from your personal physician
  • Chest Pain: Acceptable if you have been evaluated by your personal physician to rule out heart disease
  • Cardiac Catheterization: Acceptable one week following catheterization if the results were negative and with an okay from your personal physician
  • Stress Test: Acceptable if the results were negative
  • Thallium Stress test: Acceptable if the results were negative and the test occurred at least one week ago

Hepatitis

You are not eligible to donate if you were diagnosed with hepatitis after your 11th birthday. (If you were diagnosed before your 11th birthday, please contact our Medical Help Desk.)

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)

Women on hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis are eligible to donate.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

You are not eligible to donate blood if you have ever tested positive for HIV, have engaged in high risk behavior, or have had intimate contact with anyone at risk for AIDS.

Illness

Wait to donate if you have a fever, sore throat or productive cough (bringing up phlegm.) Wait if you do not feel well on the day of donation. Wait until you have completed antibiotic treatment for a sinus, throat or lung infection.

Immunization/Vaccination

The following vaccines are acceptable as long as you don’t have symptoms from the vaccination:

  • Anthrax
  • Cholera
  • Diphtheria
  • DPT
  • Flu
  • HPV (e.g. Gardasil)
  • Meningitis
  • Tetanus Toxoid
  • Whooping Cough

Wait four weeks after immunizations for:

  • German Measles (rubella)
  • MMR (measles, mumps and rubella)
  • Chickenpox
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis B (prevention only)*

Wait two weeks after immunizations for:

  • Red Measles (rubeola)
  • Yellow Fever

*If Hepatitis B immunization was given due to an exposure, you must wait one year before you are eligible to donate.

Smallpox

  • Received smallpox vaccination and did not develop complications*
    • Wait eight weeks (56 days) from the date of having the smallpox vaccination.
  • Received smallpox vaccination and developed complications*
    • Wait 14 days after all vaccine complications have resolved or eight weeks (56 days) from the date of receiving the smallpox vaccination, whichever is the longer period of time.  You should discuss your particular situation with a LifeSource staff member at the time of donation.
  • Close contact with someone who has had the smallpox vaccine in the last eight weeks
    • If you did not develop any skin lesions or other symptoms, you are eligible to donate.
    • If you have developed skin lesions or symptoms, wait eight weeks (56 days) from the date of the first skin lesion or sore. You should discuss your particular situation with a staff member at the time of donation.
*Complications may include skin reactions beyond the vaccination site or general illness related to the vaccination.

Malaria

You are not eligible to donate if you immigrated from an area at risk for malaria within the past three years or if you traveled to an area with malaria risk within the past 12 months.

(Click here to visit our Travel History section for more information about areas at risk for malaria.)

You are not eligible to donate if you have experienced symptoms of malaria within the past three years.

Medications

In almost all cases, medications will not disqualify you as a blood donor.

Your eligibility will be based on the reason that the medication was prescribed.

Click here to jump to our complete section on Medications.

Nursing

Nursing mothers are eligible to give whole blood donations six weeks after delivery.

Permanent Makeup Application

Acceptable if performed in a doctor’s office. If done in a tattoo parlor, see TATTOO.

Piercing (Ears, Body), Electrolysis

Acceptable as long as the instruments used were sterile or single-use equipment and if performed in a body piercing business establishment. Wait 12 months if there is any question whether or not the instruments used were sterile and free of blood contamination.

Pregnancy

You are not eligible to donate if you are currently pregnant or delivered less than six weeks ago.

Skin Disease, Rash, Acne, Poison Ivy

Acceptable as long as the skin over the vein to be used to collect blood is not affected. If the skin disease has become infected, wait until the infection has cleared before donating. Taking antibiotics to control acne does not disqualify you from donating.

Tattoo

If you received your tattoo in a state with state-regulated tattoo facilities, there is no deferral period to donate blood. Illinois is a regulated state.

Weight

You must weigh at least 110 lbs. to be eligible for blood donation. Blood volume is in proportion to body weight and donors who weigh less than 110 lbs. may not tolerate the removal of the required volume of blood as well as those who weigh more than 110 lbs.